SCHEDULE

We have scheduled our Programs dividing them into Day 1, Day 2, Day 3 in order to make it convenient for you to attend in absolute comfort.

25 Jan
Day 1

Keynote 1

Alain Chapel

Institut of Radiation and Nuclear safety ,France
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Biography:

Alain Chapel is scientific investigator at IRSN. He has been developing cell therapy to protect against the effects of radiation. He collaborates with clinicians to strategies for treatment of patients after radiation. He has participated in the establishment of proof of concept of the therapeutic efficacy of MSCs. He is a member of national and international societies. He is associate editor of World Journal of Stem Cells, World Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, World Journal of Radiology, The Open Gene Therapy Journal and Journal of Clinical Rehabilitative Tissue Engineering Research. He has participated in the scientific organization of international conferences.

Keynote 2

Samo Kralj

University of Maribor ,Slovenia
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Biography:

Prof. Samo Krajl is a Professor in the Department Of Physics at University of Maribor, Maribor, Slovenia. He was General chair of the 11th European Conference on Liquid Crystals (2011, Maribor, Slovenia) and of the ESF exploratory workshop “Defect-assembled soft matter for nanoscience and biotechnology” (2013, Rogaska Slatina, Slovenia).He has been awarded Silver plaque of the University of Maribor. He has published with colleagues around 150 papers with about 3000 citations.
Research Interest:
Soft matter physics, topological defects, phase transitions, surface phenomena, physics of disorder, biophysics, physics on nanoparticles

Keynote 3
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Biography:

Kathleen Hefferon received her PhD in Molecular Virology at the University of Toronto. She worked as a post-doc at the Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research and later as the Director of the Human Metabolic Research Unit in the Division of Nutritional Science at Cornell University. Most recently, Kathleen has written two books on agricultural biotechnology and is currently teaching Virology at the University of Toronto.Research Interest :Virology, biotechnology, vaccines, nutrition, global health

Abstract:

For over two decades now, plants have been explored for their potential to act as production platforms for biopharmaceuticals, such as vaccines and monoclonal antibodies. Without a doubt, the development of plant viruses as expression vectors for pharmaceutical production have played an integral role in the emergence of plants as inexpensive and facile systems for the generation of therapeutic proteins. More recently, plant viruses have been designed as non-toxic nanoparticles which can target a variety of cancers and thus empower the immune system to slow or even reverse tumor progression. The following presentation describes the employment of plant virus expression vectors for the treatment of some of the most challenging diseases known today. The presentation concludes with a projection of the multiple avenues by which virus nanoparticles could impact developing countries.

Keynote 4
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Biography:

Segundo Mesa Castillo. As Specialist in Neurology, he worked for 10 years in the Institute of Neurology of Havana, Cuba.  He has worked in Electron Microscopic Studies on Schizophrenia for 32 years. He was awarded with the International Price of the Stanley Foundation Award Program and for the Professional Committee to work as a fellowship position in the Laboratory of the Central Nervous System Studies, National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke under Dr. Joseph Gibbs for a period of 6 months, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, Washington D.C. USA, June 5, 1990. At present he is member of the Scientific Board of the Psychiatric Hospital of Havana and give lectures to residents in psychiatry.

Abstract:

There is increasing evidences that favor the prenatal beginning of schizophrenia. These evidences point toward intra-uterine environmental factors that act specifically during the second pregnancy trimester producing a direct damage of the brain of the fetus [1]. The current available technology doesn't allow observing what is happening at cellular level since the human brain is not exposed  to a direct analysis in that stage of the life in subjects at high risk of developing schizophrenia. Methods. In 1977 we began a direct electron microscopic research of the brain of fetuses at high risk from schizophrenic mothers in order to finding differences at cellular level in relation to controls. Results. In these studies we have observed within the nuclei of neurons the presence of complete and incomplete viral particles that reacted in positive form with antibodies to herpes simplex hominis type I [HSV1] virus, and mitochondria alterations [2]. Conclusion. The importance of these findings can have practical applications in the prevention of the illness keeping in mind its direct relation to the aetiology and physiopathology of schizophrenia. A study of the gametes or the amniotic fluid cells in women at risk of having a schizophrenic offspring is considered. Of being observed the same alterations that those observed previously in the cells of the brain of the studied foetuses, it would intend to these women in risk of having a schizophrenia descendant, previous information of the results, the voluntary medical interruption of the pregnancy or an early anti HSV1 viral treatment as preventive measure of the later development of the illness.

Keynote 5
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Biography:

Wanessa Medina completed her doctorate at the age of 32 at the University of São Paulo and did postdoctoral studies at the Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto. She is Director of Scientific Research at the University Center Padre Albino (UNIFIPA), an important university services organization in the interior of Brazil. Professor at UNIFIPA (Medicine, Biomedicine and Nursing courses). Coordinator of the Specialization Course in Aesthetic Health at UNIT, unit of Maceió (2012 to 2014). She is a member of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS), Advisory Director in Toxicology of INB (National Institute of Biomedicine), Advisory Director in Aesthetic Biomedicine of INB and Member of ABCFarm (Brazilian Association of Pharmaceutical Sciences) and Supervisor of the Student Chapter UNIFIPA since 2014. She has published more than 17 articles in renowned magazines and has acted as a member of the renowned editorial board.

Abstract:

Skin cancer, particularly  non-melanoma and melanoma, is the most common type of cancer worldwide and its rate of occurrence continues to rise. The constant search for non-surgical and non-invasive techniques for the treatment of skin cancer, leads to the Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is a relatively new technology in the treatment of câncer that presents fewer side effects and better aesthetic results than do surgical methods. It is a technique approved by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) for the treatment of nonhypertrophic actinic keratosis of the head and scalp. Phthalocyanines are very efficient photosensitizers that preferentially accumulate in tumor tissues. The objective of this study was to develop and characterize  hexagonal nanodispersion  containing chloroaluminum phthalocyanine (ClAlPc) to reduce the aggregation of the drug and improve its skin penetration and its antitumor effect.  The reverse hexagonal phase (referred to here as the hexagonal phase for simplicity) requires the addition of a third compound, such as oleic acid (OA), to be formed at room temperature. Aqueous dispersions of the hexagonal phase can be obtained by adjusting the composition and by dispersing this liquid crystalline phase in an excess of water in the presence of a polymeric stabilizer (such as poloxamer 407). Bulk hexagonal phases containing excess water were prepared by mixing MO (melted at 42?C) and OA at 8:2 (w/w), and by adding a 1.5% aqueous citrate buffer solution (pH 6.0) of poloxamer 407 to the lipid mixture to achieve an MO/OA/poloxamer 407/H2O system (8:2:1.35:88.65, w/w/w/w). The In vitro  skin penetration was evaluated using melanoma cancer cell line A375. In vitro biocompatibility and Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) were performed analise of Atomic Force , the In vitro studies about Cell viability assay and Cell uptake using laser chosen with  AlClPc treatment and  cell damage after PDT application. The hexagonal nanodispersion efficiently inhibits cells proliferation after photodynamic therapy and the hexagonal nanodispersion promoted the increase in the encapsulation efficiency and drug loading, reaching values of 95.8% . The formulation showed a significantly higher (p < 0.01) amount of drug retained in the skin compared to with out formulations.  PDT evidenced the antitumor efficacy of hexagonal nanodispersion with reduced cell viability for approximately 10% of cancer cells, demonstrating that the presence of ClAlPc in the hexagonal nanodispersion(HND) seems to potentialize this antitumor effect. PDT in A 375 melanoma using HND resulted in a reduction in mean cell viability of approximately 99%. According to the results obtained, the systems developed may be promising for the incorporation of ClAlPc in the treatment of skin cancer by photodynamic therapy 

Speaker 1
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Biography:

Fan has completed his PhD from Michigan State University and Post-doctoral studies from The Scripps Research Institute and University of California Berkeley. He is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Director of Macromolecular X-ray Crystallography Core Facility at University of Califorani Riverside. He has published many papers in peer-reviewed journals including Cell, Molecular Cell, PNAS, Nucleic Acid Research, etc. Research projects in his laboratory focus on structure and function studies on proteins or enzymes important to fundamental biological processes including DNA repair and recombination, amino acid metablism, and bacteria-host interactions.

Abstract:

 XPB helicase is essential for unwinding DNA at the damage site in nucleotide excision repair and melting the promoter during transcription. Inherited xpb mutations are associated with disease xeroderma pigmentosum (xp), Cockaye Syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD).  Here we explored two most important questions about XPB: 1) How does XPB open double-stranded (ds) DNA at promoters for transcription and at DNA lesions for DNA repair? 2) Why and how different xpb mutations are associated with different disease phenotypes?
Using a combination of X-ray crystallography and biophysical methods, we observed that ATP-binding induces domain rotation in XPB, allowing XPB to open dsDNA as a molecular wrench. Our results clearly distinguish XPB from a conventional helicase, which unwinds dsDNA by translocating along one strand DNA driven by ATP hydrolysis and breaking the base-pairing along the way. The molecular wrench model strongly support the important roles of XPB in both transcrition initiation and DNA repair.  In addition, we investigated the distinguished biochemical properties of three disease-causing mutations including one frame shift mutation XP11BE (for XP/CS) and two point-mutions F99S (for XP/CS) and T119P (for TTD). Our results provide the molecular basis to explain why different mutations cause different clinical manifestations.

Speaker 2
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Biography:

Dr. Malgorzata Duda is the Associate Professor in the Department of Endocrinology, Institute of Zoology and Biomedical Research, Jagiellonian University in Cracow, Poland. She received her PhD in biological sciences from the Jagiellonian University. She has published over 45 papers on the subject of endocrinology, biology of reproduction and reproductive immunology. She is a recognized expert in the all aspects of ovarian follicle and oocyte development in mammals. Her research interests focus on the molecular mechanisms of signal transduction linked to the physiological changes in ovarian follicles during early stages of folliculogenesis, with special attention to PSCs.

Abstract:

 As indicated by epidemiological studies ovarian tumors after the breast cancer are the most frequent neoplasms occurring in women. Taken into account their various cellular origin, studies on the subject which ovarian cells play a role in oncogenesis of this organ are of utmost importance. In the adult ovary, populations of cells that can be true stem cells have been identified. Due to their high diversity they are collectively known as putative stem cells (PSCs). There is a hypothesis assuming that PSCs, as a result of accumulation of mutations in them, can be involved in the formation of cancer stem cells (CSCs). That is why the aim of this work was to investigate whether potentially carcinogenic anabolic steroids used in medicine and animal husbandry (boldenone and nandrolone) can induce differentiation of ovarian PSCs into CSCs or endothelial cells what is the key event necessary for the initiation of neoangiogenesis and development of a potential tumor. Based on our findings we can conclude that in the presence of anabolic steroids PSCs can change their phenotype as evidenced by the increased expression of CSCs markers (CD44, CD133). Furthermore, PSCs also very easily differentiate into endothelial cells, what can induce angiogenesis (VE-cadherin and VEGFR-3 receptor). Both, PSCs phenotype change and their ability for differentiation into endothelium might be directly linked to ovarian carcinogenesis.

Speaker 3
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Biography:

Prof. Huanxiang Zhang has completed his Ph.D from Beijing Normal University, China and postdoctoral studies from Geneva University School of Medicine, Switzerland. He is now working in the Department of Cell Biology, Medical College of Soochow University, China. His research focuses on the control of the directed migration and differentiation of stem cells, including neural stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells and embryonic stem cells, and tissue engineering, especially the interaction between stem cells and the silk fibroin scaffolds with a variety of physical and chemical properties. Recently, his group demonstrated the close relationship between the chemotactic migration of stem cells and their differentiation states, the transdifferentiation of astrocytes to neural stem/progenitor cells or neurons, and further systematically studied the underlying mechanisms, thereby shedding light on optimization of the therapeutic potential of stem cells to be employed for tissue regeneration after injury

Abstract:

 Injury to central nervous system triggers the pronounced reactivity of astrocytes, leading to the glial scar formation and rendering the lesion unfavorable to nerve regeneration. Recent studies have shown that astrocytes, the most plentiful cells in the central nervous system, hold great promise, especially upon transdifferentiation into neurons or neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs) that can be used to replace the lost cells or ameliorate the lesion conditions, for nerve repair after injury. Our intriguing results indicate that overexpression of NEDD9 (neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated 9) can transdifferentiate astrocytes into NSCs or neurons. In this talk, I’ll summerize our data regarding the effects of NEDD9 overexpression on the conversion of astrocytes into neurons and/or NSCs in relation to the specificity of the produced neurons and the expression of the neurogenic transcription factors, and further the signaling molecules that participate in the transdifferentiation of astrocytes into neurons by NEDD9. Moreover, I’ll introduce the results about the contribution of the reactive astrocytes that have migrated to the lesion sites, and overexpression of NEDD9 to the structural and functional recovery of the injured spinal cord. These results will surely shed light on the new therapeutic strategy for nerve repair by using astrocytes as a powerful and plentiful cell source. 

Speakers 4

Shahid Ahamad

Sher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences & Technloogy ,India
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Dr. Shahid Ahamad presently working as Associate Director Research in the Directorate of Research, SKUAST-Jammu, India. He started his career as a Jr. Scientist (Plant Pathology) in 2001 in Sher-E-Kashmir Univ.of Agril. Sciences & Technology of Jammu, J.&K.; selected as Sr. Scientist/ Programme Coordinator in 2008.  He is working as Editorial board member, Reviewer/ Editor in different Journals viz. Indian Phytopathology, Annals of Plant Protection Sciences, International J. of Agri. Science, International J. of Microbiology, International J. of Genetics, Journal of Safe Agriculture, Food Journal of Agriculture & Environment (Finland)  Current Plant Biology, Elsevior etc. He Conferred Fellow of Society of Plant Protection Sciences (2005) IARI, New Delhi & Fellow of Indian Phytopathological Society in 2015. He wins many awards viz. Young Achiever Awards -2011 for his outstanding contribution in the field of Plant Pathology by SADHNA; H.P.,Distinguished Service Awards (2012) by Bioved Research Society, Allahabad U.P.; Councilor (2012-15) of Society of Plant Protection Sciences, I.A.R.I., New Delhi; Scientist of the Year Award (2013) by Society of Biological Sciences and Rural Development, Allahabad, U.P., Eminent Scientist Award 2018 by SVWS, Lucknow. He has been elected as President of Indian Phytopathological Society (NZ) for 2017 and organized one National Symposium & NZ IPS Meet 2017 as Member Secretary. He has published more than 150 publications in national and international reputed journals/magazines/News Papers etc. including 10 books in different aspects of agriculture/ Plant Pathology. He is having 20 years of experience in research, extension and teaching activities in the field of Plant pathology in general and agriculture in particular.