SCHEDULE

We have scheduled our Programs dividing them into Day 1, Day 2, Day 3 in order to make it convenient for you to attend in absolute comfort.

25 Jan
Day 1

Keynote Forum : 1
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Biography:

Ludger Johannes earned a PhD from Pierre and Marie Curie University, and completed his post-doctoral training in cell biology at Institut Curie, where he currently directs the Cellular and Chemical Biology unit. He has published more than 210 papers on retrograde trafficking and the glycobiology of endocytosis in international journals of repute, such as Cell and Nature. He is serving as an editorial board member for Traffic and PLoS One. He also aims at exploiting his discoveries for the development of innovative immunotherapy strategies against cancer. He is EMBO member since 2012, and currently holds an ERC advanced grant


Abstract:

Several endocytic processes do not require the activity of clathrin, and it has been a major question in membrane biology to know how the plasma membrane is bent and cargo proteins are sorted in these cases. Our previous studies have allowed us to propose the GL-Lect hypothesis: Nanodomain construction by GlycoLipid-binding cellular or pathological Lectins induces membrane curvature changes and drives the formation of tubular endocytic pits from which clathrin-independent carriers are generated for the cellular uptake of glycosylated membrane proteins (CD44, integrins…), pathogens (polyoma viruses, norovirus), or pathogenic factors (Shiga and cholera toxins). We are now analyzing how cortical actin dynamics contributes to the clustering of glycosphingolipid-lectin complexes on active membranes, thereby facilitating the nucleation of endocytic tubules exploiting membrane fluctuation force and asymmetric lipid compaction mechanisms that had not been linked before to endocytosis. Furthermore, we are identifying ways by which the GL-Lect mechanism is acutely controlled by growth factor signaling. Finally, we study how GL-Lect domain construction at the plasma membrane programs the intracellular distribution of cargo proteins via the retrograde transport route, thereby exploiting the polarized secretion capacity of the Golgi apparatus for the distribution of these cargoes to specialized plasma membrane domains in migrating cells (leading edge), epithelial cells (apico-basal sorting and transcytosis), and lymphocytes (immunological synapse). These studies are performed using a combination of cell biological (lattice light sheet microscopy), biochemical (membrane protein purification and reconstitution), and structural biology (cryoEM) techniques on model membranes, in cells, and living organisms.


Keynote Forum : 2
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Biography:

Malgorzata Duda is the Associate Professor in the Department of Endocrinology, Institute of Zoology and Biomedical Research, Jagiellonian University in Cracow, Poland. She received her PhD in biological sciences from the Jagiellonian University. She has published over 45 papers on the subject of endocrinology, biology of reproduction and reproductive immunology. She is a recognized expert in the all aspects of ovarian follicle and oocyte development in mammals. Her research interests focus on the molecular mechanisms of signal transduction linked to the physiological changes in ovarian follicles during early stages of folliculogenesis, with special attention to PSCs.


Abstract:

As indicated by epidemiological studies ovarian tumors after the breast cancer are the most frequent neoplasms occurring in women. Taken into account their various cellular origin, studies on the subject which ovarian cells play a role in oncogenesis of this organ are of utmost importance. In the adult ovary, populations of cells that can be true stem cells have been identified. Due to their high diversity they are collectively known as putative stem cells (PSCs). There is a hypothesis assuming that PSCs, as a result of accumulation of mutations in them, can be involved in the formation of cancer stem cells (CSCs). That is why the aim of this work was to investigate whether potentially carcinogenic anabolic steroids used in medicine and animal husbandry (boldenone and nandrolone) can induce differentiation of ovarian PSCs into CSCs or endothelial cells what is the key event necessary for the initiation of neoangiogenesis and development of a potential tumor. Based on our findings we can conclude that in the presence of anabolic steroids PSCs can change their phenotype as evidenced by the increased expression of CSCs markers (CD44, CD133). Furthermore, PSCs also very easily differentiate into endothelial cells, what can induce angiogenesis (VE-cadherin and VEGFR-3 receptor). Both, PSCs phenotype change and their ability for differentiation into endothelium might be directly linked to ovarian carcinogenesis.

Keynote Forum : 3
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Biography:

Wanessa Medina completed her doctorate at the age of 32 at the University of São Paulo and did postdoctoral studies at the Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto. She is Director of Scientific Research at the University Center Padre Albino (UNIFIPA), an important university services organization in the interior of Brazil. Professor at UNIFIPA (Medicine, Biomedicine and Nursing courses). Coordinator of the Specialization Course in Aesthetic Health at UNIT, unit of Maceió (2012 to 2014). She is a member of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS), Advisory Director in Toxicology of INB (National Institute of Biomedicine), Advisory Director in Aesthetic Biomedicine of INB and Member of ABCFarm (Brazilian Association of Pharmaceutical Sciences) and Supervisor of the Student Chapter UNIFIPA since 2014. She has published more than 17 articles in renowned magazines and has acted as a member of the renowned editorial board.

 


Abstract:

Skin cancer, particularly  non-melanoma and melanoma, is the most common type of cancer worldwide and its rate of occurrence continues to rise. The constant search for non-surgical and non-invasive techniques for the treatment of skin cancer, leads to the Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is a relatively new technology in the treatment of câncer that presents fewer side effects and better aesthetic results than do surgical methods. It is a technique approved by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) for the treatment of nonhypertrophic actinic keratosis of the head and scalp. Phthalocyanines are very efficient photosensitizers that preferentially accumulate in tumor tissues. The objective of this study was to develop and characterize  hexagonal nanodispersion  containing chloroaluminum phthalocyanine (ClAlPc) to reduce the aggregation of the drug and improve its skin penetration and its antitumor effect.  The reverse hexagonal phase (referred to here as the hexagonal phase for simplicity) requires the addition of a third compound, such as oleic acid (OA), to be formed at room temperature. Aqueous dispersions of the hexagonal phase can be obtained by adjusting the composition and by dispersing this liquid crystalline phase in an excess of water in the presence of a polymeric stabilizer (such as poloxamer 407). Bulk hexagonal phases containing excess water were prepared by mixing MO (melted at 42?C) and OA at 8:2 (w/w), and by adding a 1.5% aqueous citrate buffer solution (pH 6.0) of poloxamer 407 to the lipid mixture to achieve an MO/OA/poloxamer 407/H2O system (8:2:1.35:88.65, w/w/w/w). The In vitro  skin penetration was evaluated using melanoma cancer cell line A375. In vitro biocompatibility and Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) were performed analise of Atomic Force , the In vitro studies about Cell viability assay and Cell uptake using laser chosen with  AlClPc treatment and  cell damage after PDT application. The hexagonal nanodispersion efficiently inhibits cells proliferation after photodynamic therapy and the hexagonal nanodispersion promoted the increase in the encapsulation efficiency and drug loading, reaching values of 95.8% . The formulation showed a significantly higher (p < 0.01) amount of drug retained in the skin compared to with out formulations.  PDT evidenced the antitumor efficacy of hexagonal nanodispersion with reduced cell viability for approximately 10% of cancer cells, demonstrating that the presence of ClAlPc in the hexagonal nanodispersion(HND) seems to potentialize this antitumor effect. PDT in A 375 melanoma using HND resulted in a reduction in mean cell viability of approximately 99%. According to the results obtained, the systems developed may be promising for the incorporation of ClAlPc in the treatment of skin cancer by photodynamic therapy


Keynote Forum : 4

Dipak K. Banerjee

University of Puerto Rico ,United States

Title: Dolicholphosphate Mannose Synthase (DPMS) in Health and Disease

Time : 12:00 - 12:45

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Biography:

Dipak K. Banerjee is a professor at the University of Puerto Rico, School of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry. He received a bachelor degree (B.Sc.) in Chemistry from Calcutta University, a master degree (M.Sc.) in Biochemistry from Calcutta University and a Ph.D. degree in Biochemistry form Calcutta University, Kolkata, India. His research interests include glycoscience, cell biology and biochemistry of angiogenesis and breast cancer.  He is a member of American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Biochemical Society-UK, American Society for Cell Biology, American Association for Cancer Research, Glycobiology Society, American Association for the Advancement of Science,  Sigma Xi.  He is a AAAS Fellow and received an Inventor's Award from the US Department of Commerce.  He has authored 60 plus peer review articles and book chapters, has given nearly 200 presentations in national and international conferences.  He has received patents from the US Department of Patent and Trademark Office and has trained many high school students, undergraduate & graduate students, and postdoctoral fellows.

 

 



Abstract:

Dolichol phosphate mannose synthase (DPMS), an inverting GT-A folded enzyme classified as GT2.  The catalytic activity of DPMS has been found from archaea to human. DPMS is “key” to the biosynthesis of all N-glycans in eukaryotic cells (including cancer cells), plants and viruses (viz., HIV).  It is also essential for the synthesis of GPI anchor as well as for O-mannosylation (dystroglycan) and C-mannosylation (thrombospondin) of proteins.  DPMS sequence carries a metal binding DXD motif, a PKA motif, a variable number of hydrophobic domains, and an N-glycosylation motif (Asn-X-Ser/Thr) in some species.  The 32kDa protein is regulated by protein phosphorylation. Enzymatic dephosphorylation or removal of the phosphorylation motif by site directed mutagenesis abolishes the activation. In situ activation of DPMS by cAMP signaling causes increased lipid-linked oligosaccharide (LLO; Glc3Man9GlcNAc2-PP-Dol) biosynthesis, turnover and protein N-glycosylation. Absence of DPMS activity has been found in Type Ie congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG).

Because of the dynamic nature, DPMS actively participates in cellular proliferation and enhances angiogenesis.  In fact, DPMS overexpression supports increased N-glycosylation, cellular proliferation and chemotactic activity in capillary endothelial cells.  Since DPMS cross talks with N-acetylglucosaminyl 1-phosphate transferase (GPT), the inhibition of GPT with Tunicamycin down regulates the DPMS catalytic activity quantitatively.  The result is impaired surface N-glycan expression, inhibition of angiogenesis, induction of apoptosis by unfolded protein response signaling (upr) and the reduction of breast tumor progression in mice.  Nano-formulated Tunicamycin reduces DPMS expression expeditiously.  We, therefore, conclude DPMS could become a novel target for developing glycotherapy for treating human diseases.

Speaker : 1
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Biography:

Christophe Le Tourneau is senior Medical Oncologist at the Institut Curie and Professor of Medicine at Paris-Saclay University in Paris, France. He is heading the Department of Drug Development and Innovation (D3i). Christophe Le Tourneau was certified in Medical Oncology in 2005 and got his PhD in Clinical Epidemiology in 2007. He did a 2-year Clinical Research Fellowship at Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto, Canada, in the Drug Development Program. His main interests are precision medicine, phase I clinical trials with a special attention at the methodology to conduct these trials, as well as Head and Neck oncology. Christophe Le Tourneau is the principal investigator of numerous phase I and II trials, as well as of clinical trials in Head and Neck oncology. He ran the first randomized precision medicine trial (SHIVA01) that compared the efficacy of matched targeted therapy versus conventional chemotherapy in patients with advances cancer. He has published 150+ peer-reviewed papers in international journals.

Abstract:

Anticancer drugs including molecularly targeted agents and immunotherapeutics have been approved with one or no companion diagnostic based on a specific genomic molecular alteration. These drugs have followed the same clinical development than chemotherapeutic agents and have been developed in selected tumor types and histologies. Now, some molecular alterations have been described across different tumor types, although with variable prevalence and functional impact. The latter raises the question of whether treatment decision should be mainly based on molecular biology, independently of tumor location and histology. This approach refers to what is commonly named precision medicine and can today be addressed in clinical trials, since major advances in high throughput technologies allow depicting most druggable molecular alterations for an affordable cost in a timeframe that is compatible with clinical practice. Several studies have been initiated that aim at personalizing medicine in oncology. They include molecular screening programs, as well as precision medicine trials that can be divided in two categories: 1) stratified clinical trials according to either molecular alterations or tumor types, and 2) algorithm-based trials evaluating a treatment algorithm instead of drugs efficacy. Multiple challenges are associated with precision medicine trials, but the main one remains our ability to predict drug efficacy based on molecular alterations. It is expected that taking into account several molecular alterations for the prediction of drug efficacy using systems biology approaches will improve patients’ outcome. Bioinformatics research will be an important factor of future progression in this emerging field.                                          

Keywords: Precision medicine, oncology, tumor sequencing, biomarkers, targeted therapy, immunotherapy

Speaker : 2

Guang ZHU

The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology ,Hong Kong

Title: Chair-type G-quadruplex Structures Formed by a Human Telomeric Variant DNA and G4C2 Repeats in K+ Solution

Time : 14:15 - 14:45

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Biography:

Guang ZHU is a Professor of Division of Life Science, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. He obtained his BSc and MSc in physics. He studied for his Ph.D degree at University of Maryland and National Institutes of Health, USA, specialized in biomolecular NMR spectroscopy. Currently Dr. Guang ZHU’s research focuses on structure-functional study of human and viral proteins in DNA replication initiation. Studies on the molecular mechanisms of proteins involved in DNA replication provide basis for structure-based drug design against cancer. He has published more than 79 peer-reviewed reports. He has served on the editorial boards of International Journal of Spectroscopy, Chinese Journal of Magnetic Resonance and Scientific Report.

Abstract:

 Guanine tracts of human telomeric DNA sequences are known to fold into different four-stranded G-quadruplexes. Here, we present a novel G-quadruplex fold formed in K+ solution by a human telomeric variant d[(GGGTTA)2GGGTTTGGG], htel21T18. This variant DNA is located in subtelomeric regions of human chromosomes 8, 11, 17, and 19 as well as in the DNase hypersensitive region and in subcentromeric region of chromosome 5. Interestingly, htel21T18 forms a three-layer chair-type G-quadruplex with two loops interacting through reverse Watson-Crick A6•T18 base pair

  In addition, the large expansion of human GGGGCC (G4C2) repeats of the C9orf72 gene have been found to lead to the pathogenesis of devastating neurological diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). We showed that the two-repeat G4C2 DNA, d(G4C2)2, simultaneously formed parallel and antiparallel G-quadruplex conformations in the potassium solution. The parallel d(G4C2)2 G-quadruplex folded as a symmetric tetramer, while the antiparallel d(G4C2)2 adopted the topology of an asymmetric dimer. Our findings have demonstrated the conformational heterogeneity of the C9orf72 HRE DNA [3], and provided new insights into the d(G4C2)n folding. and may provide potential targets for structure-based anticancer and anti-ALS/FTD drug design. These works were supported by GRF (16103714, 16104315, and 16103717), VPRGO17SC07PG, 1419-281-0091-41000 and AoE/M-403-16.

 

Speaker : 3
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Biography:

Samy A. Abdel azim is Professor of molecular biology and Biochemistry At University of Cairo in 2010, In 2008: National research center of Functional and Molecular Biology. Completed his Bachelor degree in Biochemistry from University of Cairo 1982 and his Professional experience 2011. in 2009: Consultant for Clinical Analysis, 2006: Senior Specialist for Clinical Analysis, 1992: Resident in Clinical Analysis , Kasr eleini Pharmacy College Now, research focus on cell biological and biochemical biomarkers utilized for early diagnosis of diseases by detection of serum microRNA

Abstract:

Background: Alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD) is a metabolic-related disorder due to alcohol consumption that affects adults. MicroRNAs (miRs) are critical regulators for fatty acid metabolism. The role of miR-26a in increasing insulin sensitivity and metabolism of glucose and lipids has been reported.

Aims: Here, we investigated the underlying mechanisms of miR-26a in inhibiting lipid accumulation by identifying a new target of either ethanol or miR-26a action in Vl-17a cell line. Moreover, we evaluate which kind of key regulators of the fatty acid lipogenesis or catabolism is affected by miR-26a-mediated action.

Methods: MiR-26a or scrambled miR control was transduced into Vl-17a cell line using lentivirus to generate stable cell lines. Cells were treated with free fatty acids (FFA) ethanol (EtOH). The relative accumulation of triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), Malondialdehyde (MDA) and total antioxidant capacity were compared between miR-26a-overexpressing cells and controls cells. Transcription levels of marker genes for hepatic lipid homeostasis and autophagy markers were quantified using real-time PCR. Protective role of miR-26a against ethanol induced ROS and apoptosis were evaluated.

Results: Gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies demonstrated that miR-26a overexpression significantly decreased the levels of TG, TC, as well as MDA levels in the FFA+EtOH-treated Vl-17a cells and associated with a significant increase in the total antioxidant  capacity of  cells  against  deleterious  effect  of  alcohol  compared  with  its control. Further studies proved that overexpression of miR-26a resulted in reduction the expression of lipogenic genes, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers, increase in lipid secretion and autophagy markers, and subsequently led to protection of cells from ROS and apoptosis. Finally, we demonstrate that the inhibition of miR-26a reverses these previous effects which demonstrate the potential role of miR-26a in controlling the lipid metabolism.

Conclusions: Our study suggests that miR-26a suppresses hepatic fat accumulation; autophagy and protect liver from ROS and apoptosis in AFLD cell model. Taken together, our results demonstrate a novel function of miR-26a in the regulation of lipid metabolism which represents a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of AFLD.

Speaker : 4

Alain Chapel

Institute of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety ,France

Title: Stem Cell Therapy for the Treatment of Severe Sissue Damage After Radiation Exposure

Time : 15:15 - 15:45

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Biography:

 For 25 years, Alain Chapel  has been developing gene and cell therapy using non-human primates, immune-tolerant mice and rats to protect against the side effects of radiation. He collaborates with clinicians to develop  strategies for treatment of patients after radiotherapy overexposures. He has participated in the first establishment of proof of concept of the therapeutic efficacy of Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for the treatment of hematopoietic deficit, radiodermatitis and over dosages of radiotherapy. He has contributed to the first reported correction of deficient hematopoiesis in patients (graft failure and aplastic anemia) thanks to intravenous injection of MSCs restoring the bone marrow microenvironment, mandatory to sustain hematopoiesis after total body irradiation. He is scientific investigator of Clinical phase II trial evaluating the efficacy of systemic MSC injections for the treatment of severe and chronic radiotherapy-induced abdomino-pelvic complications refractory to standard therapy (NCT02814864Hirsch Index 27)

Abstract:

The late adverse effects of pelvic radiotherapy concern 5 to 10% of them, which could be life threatening. However, a clear medical consensus concerning the clinical management of such healthy tissue sequelae does not exist. Our group has demonstrated in preclinical animal models that systemic MSC injection is a promise approach for the medical management of gastrointestinal disorder after irradiation. We have shown that MSC migrate to damaged tissues and restore gut functions after irradiation.

The clinical status of four first patients suffering from severe pelvic side effects resulting from an over-dosage was improved following MSC injection in a compassional situation. A quantity of 2x106 - 6x106 MSC /kg were infused intravenously to the patients. Pain, hemorrhage, frequency of diarrheas and fistulisation as well as the lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood were evaluated before MSC therapy and during the follow-up. Two patients revealed a substantiated clinical response for pain and hemorrhage after MSC therapy. In one patient pain reappeared after 6 months and again substantially responded on a second MSC infusion. A beginning fistulisation process could be stopped in one patient resulting in a stable remission for more than 3 years of follow-up. The frequency of painful diarrhea diminished from an average of 6/d to 3/d after the first and 2/d after the 2nd MSC injection in one patient. In all patients, prostate cancer remained in stable complete remission. A modulation of the lymphocyte subsets towards a regulatory pattern and diminution of activated T cells accompanies the clinical response in refractory irradiation-induced colitis. No toxicity occurred.

MSC therapy was safe and effective on pain, diarrhea, haemorrhage, inflammation, fibrosis and limited fistulisation. For patients with refractory chronic inflammatory and fistulising bowel diseases, systemic MSC injections represent a safe option for salvage therapy. A clinical phase  II trial will start in 2018.

Keywords : mesenchymal stem cells, radiotherapy, pelvic radiation disease, clinical trial.

Speaker : 5
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Biography:

Hoda saady mohamadin  is an Associate Professor of Parasitology, South valley  University, Egypt. Dr. Saady received her doctorate in Parasitoogy  from Egyptian University. Her research interests include parasitology,Taxonomy and molocular biology.

Abstract:

During a survey on digenean parasitizing the triggerfishes, Balistidae (Rafinesque), a new locality and host record of two Opistholebetines were indicated; Macvicaria longicirrata was found parasitizing the intestine of the Titan triggerfish Balistoides viridescens (Bloch & Schneider) and Gaevskajatrema perezi collected from lower intestine of the Picasso triggerfish Rhinecanthus assasi (Forsskål). Present specimans M. longicirrata differentiated morphologically by having a longer metraterm, only small suffocation at the junction with metraterm, everted smooth cirrus without any fine spines and internal moderate tubular seminal vesicle.Throught molecular studies, M. longicirrata exhibite a distinctly separated clade from all Macvicaria spp and which can be attributed to that species collected from seawater near beach from a distant geographical area and characterized by large very long cirrus-sac with a widely extrudeable ejaculatory duct in comparison to the used Macvicaria spp in the phylogenetic analysis. Present G. perezi were typically morphologically to the previously discussed species except having a wide variability in distance between the ventral sucker and genital opening which quite longer. Within molecular data, G. perezi relationships with other Opistholebetines genra not fully understood , so  new molecular markers and more sequences are needed.

Keywords: Balistidae, Balistoides viridescens, Egypt, Gaevskajatrema, Gaevskajatrema perezi, Macvicaria, Macvicaria longicirrata, Opistholebetines, Picasso triggerfish, Red Sea,  Rhinecanthus assasi, Titan triggerfish

Speaker : 6
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Biography:

Hemely Abdelshafy Hassan  is a Professor of cytogenetics and molecular biology,Faculty of Science, South valley  University, Egypt. received his doctorate  from Egyptian University, associate professor at  21-2-2001 and Professor at 26-3-2009. He is a vice dean of teaching and students of faculty of Science SVU. His research interests include Cytogenetic and Molecular biology.

Abstract:

Among all Cainocreadium species both Cainocreadium pteroisi and Cainocreadium serrani are characterized by a multi-lobed ovary (≥ 5 lobes), uncoiled seminal vesicle and unconvoluted, short ejaculatory duct. Morphologically, these features are enough to reassign these two species in a different genus other than Cainocreadium. Furthermore, these features are the same in Pacificreadium serrani which is differentiated only by having a diverticulated excretory vesicle. Our molecular data indicate presence both Cainocreadium pteroisi  and Pacificreadium serrania as a strongly supported sister clades which in turn they must be separated from other Cainocreadium  species. This reflects: 1)invalidity Cainocreadium pteroisi within Cainocreadium and indicte presence of both Cainocreadium pteroisi and Pacificreadium serrania inside the same genus with Cainocreadium serrani.

Furthermore, Cainocreadium serrani was originally described as a distinct species Cainocreadioides serrani within its own genus Cainocreadioides (Nagaty,1956)   and separated from Cainocreadium  basing on the multi-lobed ovary and muscular Metraterm and elongate pharynx. Manter (1963) refused these characters for differentiating this genus from Cainocreadium and considered Cainocreadioides as its junior synonym. According to present molecular and morphological investigations we resurrect Cainocreadioides Nagaty, 1956 again as valid genus and Pacificreadium Durio&Manter, 1968 is just a junior synonym of it. Subsequently;

1-Cainocreadium serrani (Nagaty,1956) Manter, 1963 reassigned to be Cainocreadioides serrani Nagaty, 1956.

2-Cainocreadium pteroisi (Nagaty& Abdel Aal, 1962) Durio&Manter, 1968 will be reassigned as Cainocreadioidespteroisi (Nagaty& Abdel Aal, 1962).

3- Pacificreadium serrania (Nagaty&Abdel Aal, 1962) Durio&Manter, 1968 will be reassigned as Cainocreadioides serrania (Nagaty&Abdel Aal, 1962). Due to the resultant homology with Cainocreadioides serrani Nagaty,1956, we supposed a new name for Cainocreadioides serrania (Nagaty&Abdel Aal, 1962) to be Cainocreadioides qenai n. sp.

Keywords:  Cainocreadioides (Nagaty,1956) ,  Pacificreadium Durio&Manter, 1968systematic molecular biology

 

Speaker : 7
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Biography:

N. Furuichi is concerned?with?elucidating?hypersensitive?cell?death (HR)?of?host?plants with the recognition of the elicitor and Sup of the HR in plant cells. Current studies are examining to analyze the interaction of CDPK, NADPH oxidases ?AOS generating E) and sup of P. infestans in a single molecule analysis in the infected host cells by using the FCS (Fluorescence Cross Correlation System).?He received his Ph.D. degree in Molecular Plant Pathology with Profs. K. Tomiyama(Ann. Rev. Plant Pathology, Vol. 1 invited chapter) (1981, Nagoya U.) and had postdoctoral of S. Nishimura (1982, Nagoya U.) and of A. J. Anderson (1988, Utah State U.:USU).  He was a Project PI of Plant Defense Center, Niigata U., (2003). Had the Visiting lab, Protein Institute, Osaka University (2005-2007). He had been a Fulbright Senior Scientist, USU.(1993-94) and as a Visiting Prof., USU (1993). He is the Editor in chief, Journal of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, 2012-2015.He is the international organizing comity member of BIT, Cell Biology, and Microbiology, China, 2013-2019. He is an Advisory Board, AAAS.

Abstract:

We report that an elicitor induced generation of active oxygen (AOS) and hypersensitive cell death (HR) by treatment of potato tissues, and that the elicitor gene from a species of  Phytophthora infestans (Pi) was cloned.  Host-Selective-Toxin, Alternaric acid (AA) was reported from Alternaria solani by Furuichi (1992-2008). Representing the suppressor (Sup) for HR of plant cell from Pi was reported. The sup and AA inhibited the accumulation of phytoalexin and HR. To evaluate the activation of Ca2+ dependent protein kinase (CDPK) after the binding of Sup from Pi, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) was applied to a single GFP-CDPK and Sup tagged with Alexa- labeled-Sup antibodies(Abs). We constructed tandemly fused GFP-CDPK and Sup with the Alexa labeled-Sup Abs. Dual color FCS provides information about the coincidence of spectrally two fluorescent molecules at a single-molecule level. Here we report that for the inhibition of NADPH oxidase of potato, Sup bound to CDPK peptide (kinase domain-I and -III peptides), CDPK phosphorylated the NADPH oxidase in gel kinase assay, and that the generation of AOS by NADPH oxidase was inhibited by Sup. This means HR inhibiting Sup of the P. infestans and AA, HST of A. solani control the AOS formation in plant cell by the signal of the phosphorylation by the CDPK