SCHEDULE

We have scheduled our Programs dividing them into Day 1, Day 2, Day 3 in order to make it convenient for you to attend in absolute comfort. 

25 Jan
Day 1

Keynote 1
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Biography:

Over the past 40 years, I have worked for well-known American organizations such as world recognized institutions UC Berkeley University, Stanford University and ProQuest among others in Silicon Valley and the San Francisco bay area.  I have diverse background in both academics and industries.  As an e-book specialist and content editor have worked on a wide variety of e-books for wellknown international universities, including Harvard, Princeton, Oxford, Cambridge, Stanford, Yale, MIT, and UC Berkeley universities among others educational institutions, and large publishers including Penguin Random House, Elsevier, McGraw-Hill, Wiley and Oxford University Press, As a keynote speaker, I have successfully delivered 45 conferences including 7 talks, presentations at Stanford University and continue sharing my knowledge and experience to help people around the world.  Earned achievement and recognition awards, prizes and scholarship 

Abstract:

When you just think about it! The digital world has changed our lives in every way.   Education - the days when teachers used chalk, dusters, and blackboards are almost at an end. Black has turned to white, in the form of interactive whiteboards. The white chalk is now digital ink  Digital technology and e-learning made it easier than ever to understand, conceptualizing and analyze faster and more efficient about Cell Science & Molecular Biology. It provides the most comprehensive and effective instruction about the various systems of a cell and the interaction among various biomolecules,  and problems related to molecular and cell biology. Digital content has revolutionized the way scholars, researchers and scientists in medical field distribute and access information on virtually every platform. 

Keynote 2

Ashvin Iyer

University of the Sciences ,United States
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Biography:

Ashvin Iyer published latest article in Cells entitled Expression Profiling of Differentiating Emerin-Null Myogenic Progenitor Identifies Molecular Pathways Implicated in Their Impaired Differentiation. This article is available in PubMed with an unique identification number PMID: 29065506 and it is published in 2017. The coauthors of this article are Iyer A; Koch AJ; Holaska JM.Ashvin Iyer currently works at the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of the Sciences in Philadelphia. His current project is related to 'The use of emerin-null and EDMD-causing emerin mutant myogenic progenitors to elucidate the EDMD mechanism'.

Keynote 3

Guoping Zheng

University of Sydney ,Australia
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Biography:

Dr Guoping Zheng leads the Kidney Injury Repair and Fibrosis Study Group at the Westmead Institute for Medical Research. He has made seminal contributions to the field of kidney fibrosis in DNA vaccine, MMPs and TGF-β signaling, and is a senior research fellow at the University of Sydney.
Dr Zheng is a senior research fellow leading a NHMRC-funded research group.He achieved consistent success in funding; includes 3 NHMRC project grants (1 as CIA & 1 as CIB) & 1 NHMRC fellowship, and recently his Westmead Fellowship. He played the lead role in each of the projects. He has 2 registered patents & over 61 publications, 29 in last 5 years (18 in last 3 years, with total 1136 citations, h index 18), mostly in top ranked nephrol & leading cell biol & pathol journals. He is primary supervisor for 2 PhD students (one completed), and won WMI Science prize on 3 occasions.

Keynote 4

Jun Dou

Southeast University ,China
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Biography:

Jun Dou now is a Director, Professor of Department of Pathogenic Biology and Immunology, School of Medicine, Southeast University. He got his Medicine Doctor degree (MD, PhD) in 1997 at Zhejiang University of China. He has visited the Ulm University School of Medicine, Germany as a Visiting Scholar from Jun 1999 to Sept. 1999, and then visited the CDC, USA as a Senior Visiting Fellow from Oct. 2001 to Feb. 2004. Also, he visited the Georgia State University, USA as a Visiting Fellow from Sept. 2006 to Dec. 2006. Recently, he visited the Yale University School of Medicine, USA twice as a Senior Visiting Fellow in 2014 and in 2015. Currently his research has focused on the cancer stem cells (CSCs), the targeted CSCs by manipulation of nc-RNAs to treat breast, ovarian, colon cancers, and melanoma, as well as the CSC vaccines and CSC nanotheranostics.

Keynote 5

Muhammad Usman

Agricultural Research System ,Pakistan
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Biography:

Mr. Muhammad Usman, Former Director General of Agricultural Research System, Govt. of Pakistan who retired from service after a spotless career of about 35 years (1974-2009) with senior level experience work on the research and development of integrated agricultural industries like livestock and dairy development, aquaculture and fishery, apiculture and poultry, on a sustainable way.

Research Activities:Basically, Mr. Usman is an Agricultural scientist,  specialized himself on the improvement and advance breeding methodology of food and feed legumes from (ICARDA) from March – June 1990 at Aleppo-Syria, release several varieties and has more than 60 publications.During the service, Mr. Usman was responsible for Management, Monitoring, Evaluation, Planning of project, financial activities and the research work conducted in Pakistan as per training obtained from the University of Queensland-Australia during February 1993.

 

2.     Mr. Muhammad Usman, Former Director General of Agricultural Research System, Govt. of Pakistan who retired from service after a spotless career of about 35 years (1974-2009) with senior level experience work on the research and development of integrated agricultural industries like livestock and dairy development, aquaculture and fishery, apiculture and poultry, on a sustainable way.

3.     Research Activities:

v  Basically, Mr. Usman is an Agricultural scientist,  specialized himself on the improvement and advance breeding methodology of food and feed legumes from (ICARDA) from March – June 1990 at Aleppo-Syria, release several varieties and has more than 60 publications.

v  During the service, Mr. Usman was responsible for Management, Monitoring, Evaluation, Planning of project, financial activities and the research work conducted in Pakistan as per training obtained from the University of Queensland-Australia during February 1993.

Speaker 1

May Alqurashi

King Abdullah University of Science and Technology ,Saudi Arabia

Title: Understanding Plant Complex Cellular Response to Abiotic Stress

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Biography:

Dr. May Alqurashi, a postdoctoral fellow, was born and raised in the coastal city of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The passion for scientific research commenced in 2013 with her PhD degree in proteomics from KAUST. Postdoctoral experience includes working at KAUST and Cambridge Centre for Proteomics, University of Cambridge, UK with Professor Kathryn Lilley. Research interests include abiotic stresses and their effect on the plant proteome, second messengers and their role in signal transduction and the utilisation of computational and bioinformatic approaches toward improving the proteomic field. She authored multiple publications, a book chapter and is an active researcher

Abstract:

Environmental factors such as abiotic stresses can cause constraints on the growth, development and productivity of plants. To alleviate the impact of stress, plants initiate a complex and intertwined network of responses including hormones and signalling molecules among others. In planta, the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) has been shown to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) production through the action of plasma membrane-associated NADPH oxidases. Although quantitative proteomics studies have been performed to identify ABA- or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-dependent proteins, little is known about the ABA- and H2O2dependent proteome changes. By using 50 µM of either H2O2 or ABA on the Arabidopsis microsomal proteome and utilizing tandem mass spectrometry we idintified H2O2- and ABAdependent proteins that are differentially expressed as well as common significant peoreins shared by both. Main observations showed accumulation of proteins involved in the TCA cycle, RNA biology and enrichment of ‘response to stress’ and ‘transport’ gene ontology categories suggesting that H2O2 and ABA directly and/or indirectly are involved in a complex and partly overlapping cellular responses.

Speaker 2
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Biography:

Mr. Gomes, is a biologist with Master degree in Cellular and Molecular Biology, PhD in Biochemistry and Post-Doctorate fellow in Genetics by the Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo – USP, Brazil. Currently lecturing the disciplines of Biochemistry and Genetics in the Medical School of the Center of Higher Education Morgana Potrich Eireli, Morgana Potrich College, Mineiros, Goiás, Brazil.

Abstract:

This work describe a probable mechanism for activation of a Ste20/PakA protein kinase through intron retention process, modulated by the antifungal agent undecanoic acid (UDA) in the dermatophyte Trichophyton rubrum. For this, approximately 1 × 106 conidia/mL from T. rubrum strain was inoculated in Sabouraud medium and pre-cultured at 28°C for 96 h under constant agitation. After the pre-culture step, the mycelia were aseptically transferred to a fresh Sabouraud medium in the absence or presence of 70% and 100% of its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), and then incubated for 3, 12 and 24 h at 28°C under constant agitation. In silico analysis indicated that the ste20/pakA mRNA in T. rubrum encodes for a protein kinase with 970 amino acids, presenting the catalytic domain in the C-terminal region, and an auto-inhibitory domain (Cdc42/Rac interactive binding - CRIB) in the Nterminal. Our data suggest that retention of the intron-1generates a premature stop codon in its mRNA, followed by a new start codon and a subsequent sequence encoding for a protein that exhibits the catalytic portion with a high degree of homology with the native one, but free from the CRIB inhibitory domain. The data also indicated that the retention level was modulated by the presence of UDA. Thus, we hypothesize an alternative mechanism, for the activation of PakA by intron retention in T. rubrum, which can be modulated by UDA, probably for a faster transcriptional response through the MAPK pathway.  

Speaker 3
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Biography:

Dipak K. Banerjee is a professor at the University of Puerto Rico, School of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry. He received a bachelor’s degree in Bchemistry from Calcutta   University, a master’s degree in Bichemistry from Calcutta University and a Ph.D. degree in Biochemistry form Calcutta University, Kolkata, India. His research interests include glycosciene, cell biology and biochemistry of angiogenesis and breat cancer.  He is a member of American Society f/Biochemistry and Miolecular Biology, Biochemical Society-UK, American Society for Cell Biology, American Association for Cancer Research, Glycobiology Society, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Signa Xi.  He is a AAAS Fellow

Abstract:

Dolichol phosphate mannose synthase (DPMS), an inverting GT-A folded enzyme classified as GT2.  The catalytic activity of DPMS has been found from archaea to human. DPMS is “key” to the biosynthesis of all N-glycans in eukaryotic cells (including cancer cells), plants and viruses (viz., HIV).  It is also essential for the synthesis of GPI anchor as well as for O-mannosylation (dystroglycan) and C-mannosylation (thrombospondin) of proteins.  DPMS sequence carries a metal binding DXD motif, a PKA motif, a variable number of hydrophobic domains, and an N-glycosylation motif (Asn-X-Ser/Thr) in some species.  The 32kDa protein is regulated by protein phosphorylation. Enzymatic dephosphorylation or removal of the phosphorylation motif by site directed mutagenesis abolishes the activation. In situ activation of DPMS by cAMP signaling causes increased lipid-linked oligosaccharide (LLO; Glc3Man9GlcNAc2-PP-Dol) biosynthesis, turnover and protein N-glycosylation. Absence of DPMS activity has been found in Type Ie congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG).Because of the dynamic nature, DPMS actively participates in cellular proliferation and enhances angiogenesis.  In fact, DPMS overexpression supports increased N-glycosylation, cellular proliferation and chemotactic activity in capillary endothelial cells.  Since DPMS cross talks with N-acetylglucosaminyl 1-phosphate transferase (GPT), the inhibition of GPT with Tunicamycin down regulates the DPMS catalytic activity quantitatively.  The result is impaired surface N-glycan expression, inhibition of angiogenesis, induction of apoptosis by unfolded protein response signaling (upr) and the reduction of breast tumor progression in mice.  Nano-formulated Tunicamycin reduces DPMS expression expeditiously.  We, therefore, conclude DPMS could become a novel target for developing glycotherapy for treating human diseases.